Hustle Kingz billiards forum!
Please register now! Help this forum grow, and show your support for your favorite past time! We are now looking for moderators.

Factors that can affect your shot!

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Factors that can affect your shot!

Post  admin on Fri Feb 26, 2010 3:38 am

Cut shots throw many of people off their game. Not just newbies to the game but also people who have been playing for awhile. Cut shots can be a troublesome shot when made from a longer distance. The reason behind this is friction, ball speed, and point of impact. Most players never realize that even aiming for what they believe a correct point of impact, they are forgetting one important factor. What factor you ask? Well it is actually three main things. Squirt, throw, and swerve are all factors that can cause a dramatic impact on cut shots. You have to allow for these in order to correctly sink that cut shot on a consistent basis. Also speed, distance, pivot length, cloth, and other things can factor into this as well. Learning to use english correctly can cancel some of these effects out such as squirt, swerve, and throw. A good place to start if you are new to pool is to learn the use of english and how it can be applied. Remember most shots will not require english, and most people tend to overuse it. It should be used only at times needed. You can find good information on english at http://billiards.colostate.edu/threads/English.html
avatar
admin
Admin
Admin

Posts : 87
Points : 4468
Reputation : 0
Join date : 2010-02-24
Age : 39
Location : GA

View user profile http://www.hustlekingz.tk

Back to top Go down

Facts about throw, swerve, and squirt!

Post  admin on Fri Feb 26, 2010 3:41 am

Squirt, Swerve, and Throw Effects:
(everything you ever wanted to know about squirt, swerve, and throw)

1. Squirt increases with the amount of English.
2. Squirt does not depend on shot speed (see my September '07 article).
3. Squirt increases with the amount of shaft end-mass (e.g., a low-squirt cue has less end-mass and results in less squirt).
4. Squirt is less with a heavier CB.
5. Swerve can be zero with certain speeds and cue elevations for a given shot distance, amount of English, and cue.
6. Squirt or Swerve can be canceled using back-hand English (BHE) and/or front-hand English (FHE) aim-and-pivot methods (see my November '07 article).
7. Swerve increases with cue elevation and the amount of English.
8. Swerve occurs with practically all English shots because the cue must be elevated to clear the rails.
9. Swerve is delayed with faster shot speed.
10. Swerve occurs only while the CB is sliding; once rolling begins, the CB heads in a straight line.
11. Swerve occurs earlier with sticky cloth and later on slick cloth.
12. Swerve occurs earlier with a follow shot than with a draw shot (see my March '08 article).
13. Swerve angle is larger with a draw shot than with a follow shot (see my March '08 article).
14. Swerve angle can be predicted and visualized using the Coriolis masse-shot aiming method presented in my November '05 article.
15. For small cut angle shots (i.e., fuller hits), the amount of CIT does not vary with shot speed, but increases with cut angle (see my September '06 article).
16. For larger cut angle shots (i.e., thinner hits), the amount of CIT is significantly larger for slower speed shots as compared to faster speed shots (see my September '06 article).
17. The amount of CIT decreases some with larger cut angles, but not by much (especially for slower speed shots) (see my September '06 article).
18. Maximum CIT occurs at close to a half-ball hit (30-degree cut angle) (see my September '06 article).
19. In general, throw is larger at slower speeds, and for stun shots.
20. Both follow and draw reduce throw, and they do so by the same amount (see my October '06 article).
21. The largest discrepancy between throw values for stun and follow/draw shots occurs close to a half-ball hit (30-degree cut angle) (see my October '06 article).
22. The difference between the throw of stun and follow/draw shots is not as great at larger cut angles (see my October '06 article).
23. More English gives you more SIT only up to a point. Additional English beyond that point actually reduces the amount of SIT (i.e., more English doesn't always give you more throw) (see my December '06 article).
24. SIT is largest for a slow stun shot with about 50% of maximum English (see my December '06 article).
25. The amount of throw can increase significantly as a small amount of English is added, especially for a stun shot (see my November '06 article).
26. SIT is independent of speed (i.e., the throw is the same at all speeds) for small amounts of English (see my December '06 article).
27. "Gearing" OE results in absolutely no throw. The amount of English required for "gearing" increases with cut angle. At a half-ball hit, the amount of English required is about 50% (see my January '07 article).
28. At very small cut angles, IE and OE create similar amounts of throw (although, in opposite directions) (see my February '07 article).
29. For large cut angles, a small amount of OE can result in more throw than shots with no English (see my February '07 article).
30. For large cut angles, IE results in less throw than shots with no English (see my February '07 article).
31. IE increases throw at small cut angles, but actually reduces the amount of throw at larger cut angles (see my February '07 article).
32. OE can cause throw in either direction depending on the amount of English and the cut angle (see my January '07 article).
33. Even for large cut angle shots (thin hits), excess OE (more than the "gearing" amount) can be applied to throw the OB in the SIT direction (see my January '07 article).
34. The amount of throw with IE can be much more consistent than with OE if the amount of English varies a little. In other words, the amount of throw varies more with tip placement for OE vs. IE. This might explain why some people prefer using IE on cut shots ... because they can better anticipate and adjust for the amount of throw.
35. The least amount of throw, and the most throw consistency, occurs with fast IE shots.

Information can be found at http://billiards.colostate.edu/threads/aiming.html#English_effects
avatar
admin
Admin
Admin

Posts : 87
Points : 4468
Reputation : 0
Join date : 2010-02-24
Age : 39
Location : GA

View user profile http://www.hustlekingz.tk

Back to top Go down

Re: Factors that can affect your shot!

Post  poolshot on Fri Aug 09, 2013 4:05 am

admin wrote:Squirt, Swerve, and Throw Effects:
(everything you ever wanted to know about squirt, swerve, and throw)

1. Squirt increases with the amount of English.
2. Squirt does not depend on shot speed (see my September '07 article).
3. Squirt increases with the amount of shaft end-mass (e.g., a low-squirt cue has less end-mass and results in less squirt).
4. Squirt is less with a heavier CB.
5. Swerve can be zero with certain speeds and cue elevations for a given shot distance, amount of English, and cue.
6. Squirt or Swerve can be canceled using back-hand English (BHE) and/or front-hand English (FHE) aim-and-pivot methods (see my November '07 article).
7. Swerve increases with cue elevation and the amount of English.
8. Swerve occurs with practically all English shots because the cue must be elevated to clear the rails.
9. Swerve is delayed with faster shot speed.
10. Swerve occurs only while the CB is sliding; once rolling begins, the CB heads in a straight line.
11. Swerve occurs earlier with sticky cloth and later on slick cloth.
12. Swerve occurs earlier with a follow shot than with a draw shot (see my March '08 article).
13. Swerve angle is larger with a draw shot than with a follow shot (see my March '08 article).
14. Swerve angle can be predicted and visualized using the Coriolis masse-shot aiming method presented in my November '05 article.
15. For small cut angle shots (i.e., fuller hits), the amount of CIT does not vary with shot speed, but increases with cut angle (see my September '06 article).
16. For larger cut angle shots (i.e., thinner hits), the amount of CIT is significantly larger for slower speed shots as compared to faster speed shots (see my September '06 article).
17. The amount of CIT decreases some with larger cut angles, but not by much (especially for slower speed shots) (see my September '06 article).
18. Maximum CIT occurs at close to a half-ball hit (30-degree cut angle) (see my September '06 article).
19. In general, throw is larger at slower speeds, and for stun shots.
20. Both follow and draw reduce throw, and they do so by the same amount (see my October '06 article).
21. The largest discrepancy between throw values for stun and follow/draw shots occurs close to a half-ball hit (30-degree cut angle) (see my October '06 article).
22. The difference between the throw of stun and follow/draw shots is not as great at larger cut angles (see my October '06 article).
23. More English gives you more SIT only up to a point. Additional English beyond that point actually reduces the amount of SIT (i.e., more English doesn't always give you more throw) (see my December '06 article).
24. SIT is largest for a slow stun shot with about 50% of maximum English (see my December '06 article).
25. The amount of throw can increase significantly as a small amount of English is added, especially for a stun shot (see my November '06 article).
26. SIT is independent of speed (i.e., the throw is the same at all speeds) for small amounts of English (see my December '06 article).
27. "Gearing" OE results in absolutely no throw. The amount of English required for "gearing" increases with cut angle. At a half-ball hit, the amount of English required is about 50% (see my January '07 article).
28. At very small cut angles, IE and OE create similar amounts of throw (although, in opposite directions) (see my February '07 article).
29. For large cut angles, a small amount of OE can result in more throw than shots with no English (see my February '07 article).
30. For large cut angles, IE results in less throw than shots with no English (see my February '07 article).
31. IE increases throw at small cut angles, but actually reduces the amount of throw at larger cut angles (see my February '07 article).
32. OE can cause throw in either direction depending on the amount of English and the cut angle (see my January '07 article).
33. Even for large cut angle shots (thin hits), excess OE (more than the "gearing" amount) can be applied to throw the OB in the SIT direction (see my January '07 article).
34. The amount of throw with IE can be much more consistent than with OE if the amount of English varies a little. In other words, the amount of throw varies more with tip placement for OE vs. IE. This might explain why some people prefer using IE on cut shots ... because they can better anticipate and adjust for the amount of throw.
35. The least amount of throw, and the most throw consistency, occurs with fast IE shots.

Information can be found at http://billiards.colostate.edu/threads/aiming.html#English_effects
Great info shared. Thanks for posting!

poolshot
Newbie
Newbie

Posts : 13
Points : 1581
Reputation : 0
Join date : 2013-05-10
Location : Anaheim

View user profile http://www.qstix.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: Factors that can affect your shot!

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum